Shoulder Overview

The shoulder is a ball-and-socket-type joint that helps the shoulder move forward and backward, allows the arm to rotate in a circular motion, and hinges out-and-up away from the body. Most shoulder problems happen when soft tissues in the joint and shoulder area break down or are injured. 

What Are Causes of Shoulder Problems?

Very often, just the wear-and-tear of aging, especially when the shoulder is over-taxed. Could also be triggered by repeating the same motion, performing manual labor, or injuries from working out, playing sports or falling down.

What Are the Different Types of Shoulder Problems?

  • Dislocation – when the ball atop the arm bone pops out of the shoulder socket.
  • Separation – when the ligaments between the collarbone and the shoulder blade area tear.
  • Rotator cuff disease, such as tendinitis and bursitis – when tendons in the shoulder inflame or become red, sore or swollen.
  • Torn rotator cuff, a tear in the tendon in the rotator cuff.
  • Frozen shoulder or adhesive capsulitis, happens when movement of the shoulder is restricted.
  • Osteoarthritis – when the cartilage in the joint wears down over time and the bones rub together.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis – a disease of the immune system that causes inflammation in a joint.

What are the Symptoms of a Shoulder Problem?

The signs and symptoms depend on the type and severity of the condition or injury, and could include:

  • Pain, tenderness, tightness or stiffness
  • Decrease in your shoulder motion.
  • Muscle spasms
  • Swelling
  • Numbness
  • Weakness
  • Bruising
  • A bump in the middle of the top of the shoulder
  • Clicking or popping noise when arm is moving
  • Increased discomfort at night

What are Possible Treatments for Shoulder Problems?

Depending on the type and severity of the condition or injury, initial conservative care might include rest, ice, heat, anti-inflammatory medications, and physical therapy. If pain worsens or persists, minimally-invasive, injections can decrease inflammation within the joint and help relieve pain. Additionally, injections of anesthetic and steroid medication may be recommended to help reduce inflammation, relieve pain and restore mobility and use.

 

Bursitis of the Hip (Trochanteric Bursitis)

This is an irritation or swelling of the trochanteric bursa – a small, fluid-filled sac located on the outer side of the femur. It acts as a cushion for the thick tendon in your leg called the iliotibial band.

What Causes Bursitis of the Hip?

Repetitive stress, a fall or a hard blow to the outer side of your hip. It can also be caused by poor posture, as well as certain diseases and conditions.

What are Symptoms of Bursitis of the Hip?

The most common symptom is a sharp pain or dull ache on the outer side of your hip. It could spread to your thigh and buttock, and feel worse during physical activity. The pain may increase when you lie on the affected side of your body.

What are Possible Treatments for Bursitis of the Hip?

Treatment options include rest, medications and physical therapy. You may benefit from the temporary use of a cane or crutches. If these methods are not helpful, you may benefit from a minimally-invasive Epidural Steroid Injection – a 10-15-minute procedure that bathes the irritated nerve roots in a steroid/anesthetic medication that provides significant relief from inflammation and pain.

 

Osteoarthritis of the Hip

What is Osteoarthritis of the Hip?

Also known as degenerative arthritis, osteoarthritis is a gradual wearing away of cartilage in the joints. When that happens, the joint space begins to decrease. If degeneration is severe, bone can rub against bone. This results in severe arthritis pain within the joint.  Furthermore, the damaged bones may try to compensate for the loss of cartilage by growing outward. This can lead to bone spurs forming. The reason osteoarthritis of the hip is common is because the hip bears the weight of the body. Needless to say, this condition can have an enormous impact on your lifestyle.

What are Causes of and Risk Factors for Osteoarthritis of the Hip?

Mostly the result of the wear and tear of aging, hip osteoarthritis can also follow traumatic injury to the joint. It is more common in older people, in women, and in people who have occupations that place increased stress on the hip. Same for the extra weight of obesity. Hip osteoarthritis can also be caused by certain diseases, bone deformities, or genetic predisposition.

What are Symptoms of Osteoarthritis of the Hip?

Symptoms can include pain in the hip, inner thigh, buttocks and knees – pain that may increase with movement. You may experience a grating sensation when you walk. Your hip may feel stiff, which can interfere with your leg’s range of motion, and limit many activities.

What are Possible Treatments for Osteoarthritis of the Hip?

Depends on the severity of arthritis. In the early stages, your hip may be treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications, physical therapy, shoe orthotics and weight loss.

Minimally-invasive, corticosteroid injections can decrease inflammation within the joint and help relieve pain. Additionally, injections of hyaluronic acid may also be recommended to help reduce joint pain. Hyaluronic acid is a lubrication medication that is similar to a component that is naturally found in joint fluids.

 

Osteoarthritis of the Knee

What is Osteoarthritis of the Knee?

Also known as degenerative arthritis, osteoarthritis is a gradual wearing away of cartilage in the joints. When that happens, the joint space begins to decrease. If degeneration is severe, bone can rub against bone. This results in severe arthritis pain within the joint.  Furthermore, the damaged bones may try to compensate for the loss of cartilage by growing outward. This can lead to bone spurs forming. The reason osteoarthritis of the knee is common is because the knee bears the weight of the body. Needless to say, this condition can have an enormous impact on your lifestyle.

What are Causes of and Risk Factors for Osteoarthritis of the Knee?

Mostly the result of the wear and tear of aging, knee osteoarthritis can also follow traumatic injury to the joint. It is more common in older people, in women, and in people who have occupations that place increased stress on their knees. Same for the extra weight of obesity. Knee osteoarthritis can also be caused by certain diseases, bone deformities, or genetic predisposition.

What are Symptoms of Osteoarthritis of the Knee?

Symptoms of osteoarthritis of the knee may include pain, swelling and stiffness. The knee may become weak, and it may lock or buckle when walking. A person with osteoarthritis may have trouble bending or straightening the knee. Standing or walking for long periods may worsen this pain.

What are Possible Treatments for Osteoarthritis of the Knee?

Depends on the severity of arthritis. In the early stages, your knee may be treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications, physical therapy, a knee brace and weight loss.

Minimally-invasive, corticosteroid injections can decrease inflammation within the joint and help relieve pain. Additionally, injections of hyaluronic acid may also be recommended to help reduce joint pain. Hyaluronic acid is a lubrication medication that is similar to a component that is naturally found in joint fluids.

If you are experiencing symptoms that could be a  joint problem, contact us at New Jersey Pain Care Specialists to discuss your concerns and any treatments you may have already tried. Dr. Bram will give you the time and attention that is necessary to properly understand and accurately diagnose your condition and to recommend the most advanced, non-invasive, effective and efficient treatment to eliminate or relieve your pain.